Truck Driver in Semi TruckA recent study conducted by Stay Metrics has some interesting insight concerning why some drivers may or may not stay with their company.

Stay Metrics, which looks for solutions to driver turnover, has revealed the findings of their 2012 driver satisfaction surveys, which polled hundreds of drivers. The survey was created by Dr. Ying Cheng, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Notre Dame.

The survey contains over 80 questions on topics such as long-term career goals and satisfaction with managers and dispatchers.

[pullquote align=”right”]“While drivers between 25 and 35 make up just 10 percent of those who participated in the survey, almost half of the drivers who quit — 40 percent — come from this age group.” [/pullquote]

Why Drivers Leave Their Company

First, the survey found some of the main reasons why drivers leave their company to drive for another company. Not surprisingly: higher pay, better benefits, more time on vacation, more respect, better career advancement opportunities and/or more time at home.

Younger Driver Turnover

The results are quite telling of the different age groups of truck drivers.

“While drivers between 25 and 35 make up just 10 percent of those who participated in the survey, almost half of the drivers who quit — 40 percent — come from this age group,” said Cheng. This shows a great deal of turnover in younger drivers, who oftentimes return to school, change careers or start a new business. Drivers who had never married were also twice as likely to leave their company.

“The [25-35 year old] age group is not yet committed to the industry, let alone the carrier, and these drivers require a longer period of orientation into the industry.”

“Older drivers, those who have been in the industry for some time, are more likely to have seen the ups and downs of the job. They are less likely to let a conflict with a dispatcher or a bad set of runs cause them to impulsively leave their carrier in hopes of finding greener pastures. Seasoned drivers know by experience that the grass is not necessarily greener.”

“We’re seeing some pretty strong trends. Improving relationships and increasing respect with younger drivers, particularly those who have indicated interest in leaving for another carrier, can help companies retain drivers at risk.”

Drivers, have you contemplated leaving the industry before? What made you stay and what advice do you have for younger drivers who may not be committed to the industry?

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