Is Your Pet Summer Ready?

Tips for Taking Your Pets On The Road

With the summer season just around the corner, it’s time to make sure your 4-legged, furry co-driver is protected against ticks, hot parking lots and heat exhaustion.

Here are some tips to help your furry friend this summer:

Buy a lint roller- Even if you use flea and tick medicine, your pet may still pick up a few parasitic hitchhikers.  Buy a lint roller, keep it near your door and run a lint roller over your pet’s fur after each walk.  The lint roller will likely pick up any unattached ticks. (If your pet has longer fur, test a small patch first to make sure the tape doesn’t pull his or her fur).

Keep fresh water on hand at all times- If you regularly limit how much water your pet drinks (to minimize stops), summer is a time to be a little more generous with your pet’s water supply– chances are, he or she will work off most of the water during pit stops.

Protect your pet’s paws- Parking lot pavement can be scorching under the summer sun.  Hot blacktop and concrete can burn your pet’s paws.  Consider investing in a set of paw booties or a tin of protective wax.

Provide shade- If your pet is going to be outside for an extended period of time, make sure he or she has access to fresh water and can escape the sun’s rays.  If you your pet doesn’t like to be chained up while you work, but likes to be outside with you, the Dog Pet Play Pen is a great option.  The play yards come in four sizes: small, medium, large and extra large.  Best of all, they are affordable and fold-up flat.  They range in price, depending on the size you need, from $25 to $70. The play yards are fully enclosed (they come with a zip-top canopy that can be open or closed) and provide shade on a sunny, hot day.

Learn the symptoms of heat exhaustion in pets- Heat exhaustion, or heat stroke, can be fatal for your pet.  Learn the symptoms here:

  • Body Temperatures of 104°F-110°F.
  • Excessive Panting
  • Bright Red Tongue
  • Sticky | Dry Tongue
  • Staggering | Stupor
  • Seizures
  • Vomiting
  • Coma

Sources:

ASPCA

PETA