Symptoms of Frostbite, How to Stay Warm

Winter Gear Reccomendations

As Arctic temperatures settle in, it’s important to be mindful of the dangers associated with the severe cold.  Frostbite can set in within minutes!

Any skin that is exposed to the air is at an increased risk of frostbite.- Nose, ears, fingers, cheeks, chin and toes are most often affected.

This chart from NOAA illustrates how quickly frostbite can occur.

Frostbite
Image Credit: NOAA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

According to the Mayo Clinic, symptoms of frostbite include a prickling, tingling feeling; numbness; red, white or blueish-grayish-yellowish skin, waxy-looking skin; decreased mobility and muscle stiffness or blistering.

Because the cold often numbs your skin, you may not even realize frostbite is settling in, that’s why it’s important to fully cover any exposed skin if you’re going to be exposed to cold weather for any extended period of time.

To stay warm, use HotHands and ToastyToes  in your gloves and socks, but also, place the heating packs under your arms, on your neck and in your groin area.  Place the heating pads near major arteries.  This will help warm your blood and will help you stay warmer.

Stay Warm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To avoid hypothermia and frostbite, experts advise you:

Wait at least 60 minutes to go outside after you’ve showered.

Don’t go outside with wet hair.

Cover as much of your skin as possible.

Dress in layers:

Layer 1 or Base Layer: Should be moisture-wicking.

Layer 2: Moisture resistent clothing.

Layer 3: Coat

Recognize the symptoms of:

Hypothermia

Frostbite

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Invest in a few good pairs of gloves, so that if your gloves get wet, you can change them quickly. Also, hot hands help keep your hands warm.

 

 

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Choose wool or cotton crew socks. Try to avoid ankle or no-show socks. Also add Toasty Toes or Heated Insoles. 

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Baklavas are a great alternative to a ski mask. They protect your head, ears and neck without obscuring your view. Many are adjustable, as well.  Try a Buff.  They can be worn several different ways.

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A good base layer is very important. Look for moisture wicking material and make sure that it fits but is not too snug or too loose.

 

 

[/box] [box title=”Add a good top layer” color=”#333333″]A good top layer is one of your body’s best defenses against the elements.

 

 

 

 

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