Picketing Verizon Worker Struck By Replacement Worker’s Truck

Replacement Worker Accused Of Intentionally Striking Verizon Picketer

A man has been arrested after allegedly hitting a picketing Verizon worker with his truck in Boylston, Massachusetts, yesterday.

Verizon Worker Hit By Truck On Picket Line

Police received calls around 8 a.m. yesterday that Anthony Davenport, 48, had been hit by a pole digging truck driven by a replacement contract worker while standing on the picket line. According to reports, the truck stopped at the picket line, then suddenly lurched forward, striking Davenport.

The truck driver, 37 year old Kevin Goodale, fled the scene in a coworker’s vehicle. He later returned voluntarily.

Replacement Worker Arrested And Charged

Goodale was arrested and charged with leaving the scene of a personal injury accident, operation with a suspended driver’s license, and assault and battery with a dangerous weapon. He is being held on a $5,000 bail.

Davenport was transported to the hospital with non life threatening injuries to his hip, leg, and hand.

Verizon’s initial statement on the incident indicates that they believe the picketers were at fault for coming too close to the truck. But they were also quick to point out that Goodale is not a Verizon employee: “We are deeply concerned that the vendor that supplied this contractor did not meet its obligations under the terms of our contract and we are taking every measure to address this failing on their part.

Truck Placed Out Of Service

The Massachusetts State Police Truck Team placed the truck out of service for mechanical reasons. It was towed from the scene.

Last week, replacement contract worker George Pulling, hit a striking Verizon employee and a police officer with a pickup in Westborough. Pulling reportedly drove with the Verizon employee on the hood of his truck before stopping on an on ramp, sending the man flying into the road. He was charged with DUI and assault and battery.

The striking workers claim that Verizon overlooks background checks and does not provide adequate safety training.

Sources:
Boston
WHDH
NECN
The Boston Globe