This week lawmakers in Nevada and Rhode Island have introduced bills that would prohibit slow drivers from using the far left lane.

Rhode Island Considers Action To Keep Slow Pokes Right

In Rhode Island, Representative Dennis Canario has introduced a bill that would allow police to issue $85 citations to drivers who use the far left lane for anything other than passing other vehicles. Canario, a former police officer, believes that keeping slower traffic out of the left lane is a safety issue. He says, “It forces [passing drivers] into the second or first lane and this becomes a dangerous situation to the motoring public.’

Canario notes that most drivers realize that it is common courtesy to keep out of the left lane if you’re not passing, but some seem to need a reminder: “I think most of us learned that in driving school but as time goes on, we forget that.

Canario also encourages drivers to be self-aware: “My motto is if you’re looking ahead of you and there are no cars, and you look in the rearview mirror and there’s a quarter of a mile of cars behind you, then apparently you are the problem.”

Canario’s proposed legislation would only apply to three lane highways.

Nevada Bill Would Require Slower Traffic To Move Right For Faster Vehicles

Nevada lawmakers Chris Edwards and John Ellison introduced similar legislation on Monday.  The proposed bill would require a vehicle traveling in the far left lane to move right if the a faster vehicle is approaching from behind. If the bill passes, a first time offense would result in a $50 citation. The second offense would earn a driver a $100 ticket. A third offense would cost a habitual left-lane lingerer $250. The bill would allow for exemptions in the case of severe weather or emergencies.

Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia are also considering similar legislation to ban slow left lane drivers. New York, Michigan, and Massachusetts already have laws targeting left lane drivers on the books.